Tech Time Warp: Emoticons turn 34

Posted by Lauren Beliveau on Sep 23, 2016 11:34:00 AM

The hardest thing to convey over email or text is emotion, so a message’s real meaning often gets lost or misinterpreted. That’s why in 1982 computer scientist Scott Fahlman proposed a new form of communication—the emoticon. This Tech Time Warp goes back to Sept. 19, 1982, for a look at the birth of the emoticon.

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Topics: Tech Time Warp

Cloud 5: Oracle's cloud strategy, price wars rage on

Posted by Ron Miller on Sep 23, 2016 10:20:19 AM

Welcome to The Cloud 5, our weekly feature where we scour the web searching for the five most intriguing and poignant cloud links we can find.

Before we jump into this week's links, please have a look at one of our recent blog posts, Adobe has struck gold since moving to the cloud. Adobe has been on quite a run since it moved to the cloud, with 10 straight quarters of record revenue.

And without further delay, here we go with this week's links:

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Topics: The Cloud 5

Adobe has struck gold since moving to the cloud

Posted by Ron Miller on Sep 22, 2016 1:58:01 PM

If you need proof that a company can successfully transition to the cloud, look no further than Adobe, the creative software company that announced it was moving to a cloud subscription model in 2013 after 27 years selling boxed software.

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Topics: Cloud Trends

Navigating the IT security divide

Posted by Mike Vizard on Sep 22, 2016 10:10:16 AM

One of the great paradoxes of IT security is that the people being protected by IT security technologies have more faith in them than the IT professionals that deploy and manage those technologies.

A recent survey of 1,110 senior executives conducted by The Economist Intelligence Unit on behalf of VMware finds that 40 percent of IT executives expect a major attack on their organization to be successful within the next three years. In contrast, only 25 percent of the C-level executives felt the same way.

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Topics: IT Security

Oracle so desperately wants to be a cloud player now

Posted by Ron Miller on Sep 21, 2016 1:15:11 PM

Oracle has been holding its Open World customer conference this week in San Francisco, and that noise you hear is Larry Ellison pounding his chest and telling the world he's coming for AWS.

All I can say is good luck, because they have a long, long road ahead of them, and it's going to take more than bluster to get there.

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Topics: Cloud Trends

Bare metal servers gain momentum in the cloud

Posted by Mike Vizard on Sep 20, 2016 9:53:05 AM

Bare metal servers are a growing niche of the public cloud space, and IT service providers should start paying more attention to it as the nature of the application workloads being deployed in the cloud continues to evolve.

Today, a bare metal server is most often used by a Big Data application or some other type of workload, such as gaming, where the performance penalties associated with virtual servers is just too high. The dominant provider of bare metal servers in the cloud is IBM, which acquired SoftLayer back in 2013. One of the major things that differentiated SoftLayer is that it provided support for both bare metal and virtual servers.

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Topics: Cloud Trends

Ask Intronis: How can my sales team give effective presentations?

Posted by Lauren Beliveau on Sep 19, 2016 7:30:00 AM

Q: My sales team has increased their on-site meetings in the past few months. Some reps have been extremely successful with this approach, but others haven’t. Are there any tips I can use to help my team become more successful in delivering this type of sales presentations?

Extending your reach and visiting prospects and SMB partners in person can really help you strengthen the relationship. By doing this, you’re giving your prospects a face to put to your brand instead of being just another sales person on the phone. Having a personal aspect to your brand can help gain new customers and grow existing relationships by subtly reminding them of your commitment to them.

Creating an effective sales presentation is definitely an art, and to give you the best advice possible we consulted Scott Bennett. He is the Director of North America Partner Management at Intronis MSP Solutions and has won over numerous partners by delivering successful sales presentations. Scott sincerely believes that a good presentation starts with a good foundation, and he shared his best practices to help your MSP sales team achieve that.

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Topics: Ask Intronis

Tech Time Warp: From CryptoLocker to CryptXXX

Posted by Lauren Beliveau on Sep 16, 2016 12:27:00 PM

It’s almost hard to believe that CryptoLocker only turns three this month. This IT nightmare that started the ransomware craze first appeared in September 2013, letting hackers encrypt files and hold them hostage. Within the first 100 days alone, CryptoLocker made over $30 million dollars.

As many businesses have learned firsthand, CryptoLocker starts with social engineering and a simple email which infiltrates the system and encrypts files with a 256-bit AES key. Once the malware has infected the system, the only fix is to wipe the system and recover the latest backup—otherwise you’re forced to pay the ransom.

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Topics: Tech Time Warp

Cloud 5: Google's big cloud victory, why public cloud wins

Posted by Ron Miller on Sep 16, 2016 9:20:49 AM

Welcome to The Cloud 5, our weekly feature where we scour the web searching for the five most intriguing and poignant cloud links we can find.

Before we jump into this week's links, please have a look at one of our recent blog posts, Google Cloud brings Evernote into the fold with a big cloud win. Google's enterprise cloud business scored a big victory this week when it landed Evernote, but the deal wasn't in isolation. It was part of a wider trend of companies moving to the public cloud.

And without further delay, here we go with this week's links:

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Topics: The Cloud 5

FTC lays down the ransomware law

Posted by Mike Vizard on Sep 15, 2016 11:50:04 AM

The chair of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is advising businesses that the FTC might hold them accountable for not fixing vulnerabilities commonly exploited by cybercriminals launching ransomware attacks.

FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez says the actual ransom demand is usually $500 to $1,000 but can be as high as $30,000. Based on data from the FBI, the U.S. government estimates there are now 4,000 ransomware attacks being launched per day, representing a 300 percent increase over the 1,000 ransomware attacks per day in 2015.

Even more concerning for the average organization, Ramirez also revealed that thus far the FTC has pursued more than 60 enforcement actions against companies that have been hit by ransomware. That may seem like a government effort to punish the victim of a crime, but the FTC is starting to make it clear that the careless handling of data is indeed a potential crime punishable by fines that far exceed the ransom being demanded by hackers.

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Topics: IT Security

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